Aspermia

Aspermia

Aspermia describes the condition where there’s no sperm present in the manly semen and constantly produces sperm.
Sperm cells are collected in the epididymis (a small sac connected to each testicle) and stored there until after the time when the manly rung orgasm and ejaculates. During the process of interjection, a thick, largely concentrated mass of sperm cells ( roughly 100 million cells) from the epididymis travels through the vas deferens, an irregular hallway connecting the testicles to the prostate gland. In the prostate gland, sperm are mixed with more fluid stashing from the prostate gland, seminal vesicles, and Cowper’s gland, performing in the ivory-colored fluid (semen) that’s released from the penis during interjection.


The function of the sperm cells is to give manly origin cells able of fertilizing an egg. By far, the vast maturity of cells present in semen is sperm cells from the testicles. The function of the glandular fluid is to give a medium for transporting the sperm and an ideal terrain in which the sperm cells can swim toward the egg. From birth through early nonage, the testes naturally don’t produce sperm. After the onset of puberty during nonage, the sperm-producing cells of the testes typically come active and remain active throughout the utmost of majority.